by Matthew Sterne on March 4, 2014
5 min read

For the last two months Poodle and I have had somewhat of a crush on everything Lori does. It all started when we feasted our eyes on Lori’s photographs of Namibia. We oohh-ed and ahhh-ed at the rich earthy colours of her photographs, relishing the soft, warm light that seemed to follow her lens. It was this initial admiration that encouraged us to search for more of Lori and we were not disappointed. Lori’s blog, Lori times five, presented us with colourful snippets of her artisan ways including pom-poms (who doesn’t like pom-poms?) and hands down the best looking orange peal we’ve ever seen.

Orange-and-Pom-Pom

We began to act as though we knew Lori. This is one of the many conversations we had that centered around Lori:

“This is so Lori,” Poodle said, pointing at Lori’s beautifully knitted Halldora.

“I know!” I responded. “Don’t you love how she disregards capital letters? So very E E Cummings of her.”

Poodle nods in agreement. “She’s the best.”

We were relieved to discover that our savvy travel consultant, Dee Dlamini, put together other African expeditions for Lori and her husband, Chuck as well. Lori captures the Victoria Falls and Lori explores Zimbabwe and Botswana quickly followed this finding. But we’ve been slower to produce the fourth blog in the mini-series for the sole reason that it would mean closing the first chapter of The Adventures of Lori (we’re hoping that Lori and Chuck will go on another trip so we can launch chapter two).

In the last installment, I wrote about the popularity of what is commonly misunderstood to be Mark Twain’s quote – “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did…”. In keeping with the theme, I’ve decided to bring The Adventures of Lori to a temporary close with one of my personal favourite quotes about traveling. It describes what for me is one of the greatest gifts of venturing far from home: the ability to admire the familiar from a fresh perspective. It reminds me of Lori because she has a unique way of looking at things, irrespective of whether it’s a common place orange or the great Zambezi.

Quote Marcel Proust

And so it is with a tinge of regret and a healthy dose of pride that we bring you the last photographs (at least for the time being) from Lori.

This is Zimbabwe through Lori’s eyes…

A pool with a view|Mana Pools

A pool with a view| Mana Pools

A pair of hippos | Mana Pools

A pair of hippos | Mana Pools

"A leopard eating his kill, an antelope that he'd dragged up this tree. We sat and watched in complete silence with only the light that the moon and the stars could provide, occasionally our guide would point the spotting light. My sister and her great flash managed to capture this amazing shot. We stayed at least an hour until the leopard stood, stretched and then in the elegant way only a leopard can, he climbed down and slowly walked away..."

“A leopard eating his kill, an antelope that he’d dragged up this tree. We sat and watched in complete silence with only the light that the moon and the stars could provide, occasionally our guide would point the spotting light. My sister and her great flash managed to capture this amazing shot. We stayed at least an hour until the leopard stood, stretched and then in the elegant way only a leopard can, he climbed down and slowly walked away…”

"We saw so much, so many different types of behavior, weavers building nests, dung beetles rolling their balls of elephant poo, saddle billed storks fishing, monitor lizards sticking out their tongues to catch an insect flying by, we saw seventeen giraffe walk in single file across a plain and come to a waterhole to drink (I got tears at that)...

Nyamandhlovu Pan, Hwange

"We saw so much, so many different types of behavior, weavers building nests, dung beetles rolling their balls of elephant poo, saddle billed storks fishing, monitor lizards sticking out their tongues to catch an insect flying by, we saw seventeen giraffe walk in single file across a plain and come to a waterhole to drink (I got tears at that)..." | Hwange

“We saw so much, so many different types of behavior, weavers building nests, dung beetles rolling their balls of elephant poo, saddle billed storks fishing, monitor lizards sticking out their tongues to catch an insect flying by, we saw seventeen giraffe walk in single file across a plain and come to a waterhole to drink (I got tears at that)…” | Hwange

Chuck Graham zooming in on a glassy Lake Kariba

Chuck Graham zooming in on a glassy Lake Kariba

Malachite Kingfisher | Lake Kariba

Malachite Kingfisher | Lake Kariba

A hawk from the vantage point of the foliage |Lake Kariba

A hawk from the vantage point of the foliage | Lake Kariba

"The enormous speed and agility with which they picked themselves up and ran made it easy to see how they are one of the most dangerous animals in Africa, they are fast! And oh so powerful." | Lake Kariba

“The enormous speed and agility with which they picked themselves up and ran made it easy to see how they are one of the most dangerous animals in Africa, they are fast! And oh so powerful.” | Lake Kariba

"Canoeing on the Zambezi River."

Canoeing on the Zambezi River.

"Hello hippo, don't mind us." | The Zambezi River

“Hello hippo, don’t mind us.” | Zambezi River

"Here we are in this little tiny canoe with crocodiles and hippos lurking right under the water. And on the banks. Just about everywhere." | The Zambezi River

“Here we are in this little tiny canoe with crocodiles and hippos lurking right under the water. And on the banks. Just about everywhere.” | Zambezi River

"Hippo were here, notice their four very cute toes..." | The Zambezi River

“Hippos were here, notice their four very cute toes…” | Zambezi River

"We all climbed out of our boats to this temporary little sandbar and had Gin & Tonic's, wine and beer and toasted our good fortune and amazing adventure." | The Zambezi River

“We all climbed out of our boats to this temporary little sandbar and had Gin & Tonic’s, wine and beer and toasted our good fortune and amazing adventure.” | Zambezi River

"At the end of our paddle all of us came close together, three boats side by side. Paddles were put down and we drifted in silence ~ taking it all in. One big collective sigh..." | The Zambezi River

“At the end of our paddle all of us came close together, three boats side by side. Paddles were put down and we drifted in silence ~ taking it all in. One big collective sigh…” | Zambezi River

A crash of hippos bathing in the last light. | The Zambezi River

A crash of hippos bathing in the last light. | Zambezi River

A final note on Lori’s admiration for Africa…

“Your beautiful continent continues to bring lots of joy to my life!”

Chuck and Lori-Ann Graham

Chuck and Lori-Ann Graham


If you love Lori’s photographs and stories as much as we do, why not plan your very own adventure to Zimbabwe. Contact one of our expert consultants to get started.

For more of Lori’s photographs and stories, take a look at Lori times five.